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Victims' Symptom : glossary:ritual
 
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Ritual and mourning

(From the perspective of anthropologic and psychological phenomena, rituals have certain importance in processes of griefGrief without complications is a normal response to loss. In the first phase it is usually manifested as a state of shock, with expression of numbness or bewilderment ... and mourningMourning, act of bereavement, grief and mourning are terms that apply to the psychological reactions of those who survive a significant loss ...).

George et al. (1995) describes that most headhunting traditions in island of Southeast Asia connect ritual violence to griefGrief without complications is a normal response to loss. In the first phase it is usually manifested as a state of shock, with expression of numbness or bewilderment ... and mourningMourning, act of bereavement, grief and mourning are terms that apply to the psychological reactions of those who survive a significant loss .... Some notions were made about rage and catharsis, debating intense emotions motivate persons to take up cleansing acts of violence. Others researches were made in order to give more complex understanding of how ritual may be linked with processes of bereavementMourning, act of bereavement, grief and mourning are terms that apply to the psychological reactions of those who survive a significant loss ... and violence. Ritual practices point out that the resolution of communal mourningMourning, act of bereavement, grief and mourning are terms that apply to the psychological reactions of those who survive a significant loss ... is more significant than personal catharsis as a motivation for violence. Also that individual affect is remodelled collectively as “political affect” and that different forms (vows, songs, noise, etc.) mediate the ways in which people resolve the griefGrief without complications is a normal response to loss. In the first phase it is usually manifested as a state of shock, with expression of numbness or bewilderment ....

Another finding (Cowles, 1996) indicated that individuals from different cultural backgrounds have “knowledge of griefGrief without complications is a normal response to loss. In the first phase it is usually manifested as a state of shock, with expression of numbness or bewilderment ...” that was derived from their personal experiences almost in the same way as did the authors of the professional literature. The findings also showed that cultural differences are perceived in mourningMourning, act of bereavement, grief and mourning are terms that apply to the psychological reactions of those who survive a significant loss ... rituals, traditions and behavioural expressions of griefGrief without complications is a normal response to loss. In the first phase it is usually manifested as a state of shock, with expression of numbness or bewilderment ..., without any specific differences in the individual, intrapersonal experience of griefGrief without complications is a normal response to loss. In the first phase it is usually manifested as a state of shock, with expression of numbness or bewilderment ... that can be linked with cultural heritage or ethnicity. Lobar et al. (2006) described practices surrounding deceased ones by European, Asian, Caribbean, Central American, and South American families living in the United States. Common theme of this research was that families of dead persons perform rituals and ceremonies in order to foster passage to God, the “light,” or another life. If their beliefs were stronger, they were more dedicated in performing such rituals and ceremonies according to their religion or culture.

(T.J.)

References:

  • George KM. Violence, solace, and ritual: a case study from island Southeast Asia. Cult Med Psychiatry. 1995;19(2):225-60.
  • Lobar SL, Youngblut JM, Brooten D. Cross-cultural beliefs, ceremonies, and rituals surrounding death of a loved one. Pediatr Nurs. 2006;32(1):44-50.
  • Riddell MB. Ritual Abuse. Los Angeles: Ritual Abuse Task Force, Los Angeles County Commission for Women, 1989.

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