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Victims' Symptom : glossary:malingering
 
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Malingering

Malingering is the intentional faking of physical or psychological illness or symptoms. These symptoms are faked in order for some reason, such as gaining medication, getting disability payments, or missing work, i.e. malingering is intentional production of false or exaggerated symptoms motivated by external incentives, such as obtaining compensation or drugs, avoiding work or military duty, or evading criminal prosecution (Morrison, 1995).

Malingering is not considered a mental illness. In the DSM-IV, malingering is the one of other conditions that may be a focus of clinical attention. Malingering behavior typically persists as long as the desire benefit outweighs the inconvenience or distress of seeking medical confirmation of the feigned illness. Malingering should be suspected in any of these situations: the patient has legal problems or the prospect of financial gain; the patient has Antisocial Personality Disorder; the patient tells story that does not accord with informants’ accounts or with other known facts and the patient does not cooperate with the evaluation (Reid, 2000). Malingerers tend to avoid symptoms such as those associated with more serious psychiatric disorders, because the pretense is very difficult to maintain and objective measures could detect the difference. On the other hand, to feign a sad mood, loss of interest in formerly enjoyed activities or a low energy may not be so difficult to demonstrate (Rogers, 1997). Malingering is often confused with factitious disorderAccording to the DSM-IV Factitious Disorder is a intentional production or feigning of physical or psychological signs or symptoms ... (in which the motive is not external gain but a wish to occupy the sick role) and the somatoform disorderSomatoform disorders have emotional origins and include the following symptoms: excessive or chronic pain, conversion symptoms, chronic and multiple symptoms without adequate explanation, complaints that do not improve despite the use of treatments that help most patients, and excessive concern with health or body appearance ... (in which the symptoms are not intentionally produced at all) (Morrison, 1995).

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References:

  • Rogers R. Clinical Assessment of Malingering and Deception. 2nd ed. New York: Guilford Publications, 1997.
  • Reid WH. Malingering. Journal of Psychiatry Practice. 2000: 226-228.
  • Morrison J. DSM-IV Made Easy. New York, The Guilford Press, 1995:539.

See also:

Malingering PTSD

Malingering PTSD is a diagnosis particularly vulnerable to the malingering because it is characterized by a number of subjective symptoms and is commonly associated with reinforcing financial and personal gain (disability benefits) (Early, 1990). Personal gain is always the motivation for malingering. During the past 20 years, research regarding the ability to detect malingering, the feigning of symptoms for secondary gain, in PTSDPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the anxiety disorders that occur after a person sees, is involved in, or hears of an extreme traumatic stressor ... claimants has grown rapidly. PTSDPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the anxiety disorders that occur after a person sees, is involved in, or hears of an extreme traumatic stressor ... is also characterized by a variable symptom profile and is highly comorbid with a variety of clinical and personality disorders, making detection of malingering a challenging endeavour (Guriel, 2003). Early, E. (1990). Imagined, Exaggerated and Malingered Post-Traumatic Stress DisorderPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the anxiety disorders that occur after a person sees, is involved in, or hears of an extreme traumatic stressor .... In: Meek, L.C., ed. Post-Traumatic Stress DisorderPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the anxiety disorders that occur after a person sees, is involved in, or hears of an extreme traumatic stressor ...: Assessment, Differential Diagnosis and Forensic Evaluation. Sarasota, Florida, Professional Resource Exchange, str. 137-156.

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References:

See also:

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